Long Hunter State Park - Tennessee

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Description

Long Hunter State Park is situated along the shore of J. Percy Priest Lake. It consists of four units: Couchville, Baker's Grove, Bryant Grove and Sellars Farm. Picnicking, swimming, hiking, backpacking, boating, fishing, nature photography and wildlife observation are among the activities available to park visitors. Planned activities include interpretive and recreation programs for the general public and environmental education programs for school and other interested groups.

Biking

The Jones Mill mountain bike trail is located in the Bryant Grove Recreation Area. It features two loops: one two-mile loop and one four-mile loop. These trails offer a variety of challenges to mountain bikers and a great view of the lake from Bald Knob. Hikers are also welcome on the bike trail.

Boating

J. Percy Priest Lake

Pleasure boating and water-skiing are popular on the 14,000-acre J. Percy Priest Lake. Long Hunter offers two launch ramps on J. Percy Priest Lake.

Couchville Lake

Rental boats are available for Couchville Lake at the park during the summer-use season.

Small personal boats without gasoline or diesel motors are allowed year round on Couchville Lake. There is no launch ramp on Couchville Lake for private boats.

Lifejackets are required to be worn by anyone on Couchville Lake, including individuals using park rentals or a personal craft.

Camping

Backcountry Camping

Long Hunter State Park has two backcountry camp sites that are located at the end of the 5.5 mile long Volunteer Trail. The trail head for the Volunteer trail is located just off of Hobson Pike at 1594 Bakers Grove Rd. There is a sign on Hobson Pike to indicate the location of the trail head. The Volunteer Trail is a linear trail so a hiker hikes in and out on the same trail without looping. The only naturally occurring water on the trail is Percy Priest Lake.

There is no charge for camping in the backcountry sites however we do ask that campers stop by the park office at 2910 Hobson Pike to fill out a camper registration form and pick up a trail map.

Fishing

Fishing on the J. Percy Priest Lake is very popular at Long Hunter. Catches include large- and small-mouth bass, rockfish, stripe, crappie, bream and catfish. There is no charge for fishing; however, all fishermen over 12 years of age must possess a valid Tennessee fishing license.

Valid TN fishing license required

Hiking

There are several hiking trails at Long Hunter designed to provide pleasant walking experiences for all. Among the more popular is the two-mile loop Lake Trail around Couchville Lake. It is also home to the Jason Allen Arboretum Trail at Couchville Lake that weaves its way through the first certified arboretum in a Tennessee State Park. Visitors along the Jason Allen Arboretum Trail will see 44 stenciled leaves on the barrier-free, hard surfaced path that signify where the different trees are marked. These stenciled leaves were created by Tina Turbeville, a Friend of Long Hunter, who worked with Jason and Fred Dickson, another Friend of Long Hunter, to carefully apply the leaf stencil to the Arboretum trail. Unlike most sites where trees are planted for the sole purpose of creating an arboretum, these trees were already occurring naturally around Couchville Lake. This provides a wild feel and makes the arboretum site even more special.

The Nature Loop Trail and Inland Trail located at Couchville, are popular short walks. The mile-long Deer Trail begins at the park office and meanders through old field and young forest habitats. The longer Bryant Grove Trail connects Bryant Grove to Couchville.

For the more adventurous, the Bakers Grove Primitive Use Area offers longer day hikes on the Day Loop Trail, and day hiking and overnight camping on the Volunteer Trail. These trails wind along the shore of J. Percy Priest Lake, climb overlook bluffs, and wander through hardwood forest, cedar glades, and interesting rock outcroppings.

Meeting Facility

Thepark also features the Liana Dranes Nature Circle Room at the park office that can accommodate 25 people arranged classroom style or 40 people arranged conference room style.

The park provides two large picnic shelters. The Bryant Grove site is situated around a central parking area and provides lakeshore swim beach, a rustic playground and a volleyball court. The Couchville site, located a short walk from the two parking areas, is located on Couchville Lake near the barrier free Lake Trail. Picnic shelters may be reserved for family reunions, church groups, or other group outings. Each shelter is convenient to restroom facilities. The park begins taking reservations for the shelters on January 1.

Swimming

Non-supervised swimming is permitted at Bryant Grove. Swimming in Couchville Lake and in the area of boat ramps is prohibited. CAUTION: The lake bottom is hazardous and you must swim at your own risk!

Pet Policy

While Long Hunter is a pet-friendly state park, not all areas of the park are open to pets. Bryant Grove and Couchville Lake picnic areas do not allow dogs or other pets. Please note pet accessibility signs at various locations inside the park.

Please Remember

Long Hunter is a sanctuary. All area features including plants and animals (living and non-living), rocks, minerals, artifacts, and fossils are protected by State law. Violators are subject to prosecution. Please be careful with fires and help us keep your park neat and natural.

Tour Buses

Tour buses are welcome.

Contact

Long Hunter State Park, 2910 Hobson Pike, Hermitage, TN 37076

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